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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
) ♪ >> hello, and welcome to the department of elections right choice voting instructional video. it is part of the department of elections right choice voting outreach campaign and is designed to educate san francisco rig franciscoht choice voting. today we will learn what it is and who is elected using this voting method. we will also talk about with the ranked joyce l. looks like and how to market correctly. finally, we will see how the ranked joyce voting process works and to you an example of an election using ranked choice of voting. so, what is ranked joyce voting? in march 2002 san francisco voters adopted a charter to implement ranked choice of voting, also known as instant runoff voting. san francisco voters will use it to elect most local officials by selecting a first choice candidate in the first column on the ballot and deborah second and third choice candidates in the second and third columns resect to do -- respectively. this makes it possible to elect local officials with the majority of votes. more than 50% without the need for a second runoff election. in san francisco, ra
college town in america by people who ranked us. so when i was elected mayor i got the best spot in the city in front of city hall which is in the heart of our downtown. what are we going to do with this? i got to park benches we were not using anymore in the tree was being cut down. we hollowed out the tree and sliced it into chunks and put flowers in it and created the smallest park in the city. instead of reserve for mayor we have assigned it said reserve for mayor and friends. automatically small things change instantly the way people thought about how much space we use for cars. change was possible on a small budget and it changed the way people protested my decision. they take right away to the parking spot. i didn't anticipate that one. they say the sign says friends right there. that kind of creativity -- in the last thing is, the first is energy in the second is creativity and the last thing as moral authority. i mean in an unambiguous sense of what is right and what is wrong and fair. it is not true of everybody but for a lot of us that same six euro bill as a dinosaur.
in the next legislative session which is right around the corner. we know we have an election in just a few weeks and a lame-duck session and then we will be returning for the 113th congress so i appreciate you being here and i appreciate everybody being here for your session in washington and with that, this hearing is adjourned. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> we take you live now to georgetown university where we are waiting for discussion to get underway on the future of american democracy. while we wait for this event, here are some comments from first-time voters reacting to last night's presidential debate. the this from "washington journal." [inaudible conversations] >> host: first-time voters only, henry and greensboro north carolina, henry tell us your story. why are you a first-time voter quest. >> caller: i have always felt politics was politics but now when you say the 47%, what night you care about everybody in the next night 47%. i don't like a flip-flopper and to me it just sounds like a flip-flopper. and i don't understand. he wants to put
. this district election is really important. i am proud to be here. this is a great organization. we have nine candidates and hello everyone. it's a pleasure to see everyone in the beginning and hopefully they remember me later. the way it will work is the candidates will have one minute that you submitted. i have four questions to start with, plus the league will have their own questions and we invite you to get your questions and someone will get them. the questions have been submitted on the leauge of women voters website and every candidate is going to answer every question, so now we have time keepers. our time keepers, our lovely time keepers are out in front here and they will hold up a yellow card to signify to the candidates have third seconds remaining and a red card when it's time to stop and we ask that everyone be respectful,y -- no booing and no hissing and we want to stay on the time line and you have important decisions to make on november 6 so this will give you an opportunity to have your candidates heard. all right. so we're going to begin -- it's alphabetical orde
. you're in "the situation room." >>> only 33 days to election and an entirely new dynamic in the battle between president obama and mitt romney. the republican nominee is widely seen as the winner of last night's debate while even the president's strongest supporters now concede he was not at the top of his game. and now the president is back out there on the campaign trail. he's getting ready to speak at a rally over at the university of wisconsin in madison. we're goingo be hearing from him live this hour. but first, listen to what he said about mitt romney at a rally earlier today before he left denver. >> when i got on to the stage, i met this very spirited fellow who claimed to be mitt romney. [ laughter ] but it couldn't have been mitt romney because the real mitt romney has been running around the country for the last year promising $5 trillion in tax cuts that favor the wealthy. the fellow on stage last night said he didn't know anything about that. the real mitt romney said we don't need anymore teachers in our classrooms. don't boo, vote. [ cheers and applause ] but the fellow
of this discussion of all of the polices. are our elected officials making policy decisions that are sustainable? that promote equity? or are they for-sale to the highest bidder? these are the things that we need to address, otherwise you will have the exact same problems of people asking for more and more people and creating a city where there is very wealthy and very poor people. so i would like to give a quick shout out in that direction to supervisor olague, who is having the san francisco housing authority try to film its meetings. it doesn't even meet at city hall and this is the kind of inequity i'm talking about. we need accountability. so i appreciate that and we need that. thank you. >> thank you, mr. everett. >> i'm the type the progressive who grieves believes that we're only as wealthy as the least among us. so means that in san francisco we can only go as far as the african-american young men and women who have been economically disadvantaged for generations here in the city. we need to provide jobs. with when we talk about green jobs of future and sustainable produce, we need
? >> yes, >> i have a comment. and i just, i want to raise sort of rule number six on the election of officers. just to open up the conversation. you know, i don't know if i feel strongly one way or the other, does feel like a one-year term is relatively short for president and vice president to be in office. and maybe commissioner caen can answer this a bit and probably best since she's been here. but also this issue that a serving president or vice president is ineligible for a second term. i don't know where the origin of that was and i'm just curious. i believe commissioner caen that maybe, i'm asking about the election of officers and how it's a one-year term and you can't serve an additional second year term. just the origin of that and whether that seems to be a policy that the commission feels like is a good one. >> well, it has been the policy of the commission ever since i recall. and the idea behind it, or one of ideas behind it is that if one serves as an officer, they get to know the commission limp as you go from being a president, you're still very involved in the co
? and if elected, what would you do to address it? and we'll start at one end of the table and move to the other. so miss breed or miss selby. >> boy, it's hard to pick one. i think that right now we are really suffering -- i'm going to look at district 5 in particular. we have a safety issue in district 5 right now. it has gotten more dangerous, particularly in the lower haight, hayes valley and even in pacific heights. we have a situation where in 23 days this were 100 assaults. and of those 100 assaults, 67 of them were for iphones. i actually have a relatively simple solution for this. i would like us to look at -- it would be nice if you could ask apple to disable their phones. they now able to erase your information, but they will not disable your phone or at&t. unfortunately i'm afraid government is going to have to step in and say you must do this or we will sue you. there is lots of police time and energy and worse, there are many, many citizens who are getting really badly hurt for their iphones and their ipads. >> thank you, mr. resignato. >> i'm going to go back to transit issu
from nebraska, but a u.s. senator. if elected, how will you balance economic interests of agriculture with those of the nation, and should confiscate any to require use of up to 15 billion gallons a year of ethanol, taking 40% of the nation's corn crop, when critics say that raises food prices for everyone? >> the critics are wrong. the nation plus interests in agriculture are aligned. it is one of our most competitive industry. the interest of agriculture and the united states are aligned and i am appalled that neither governor romney or president obama is talking about agriculture in this campaign. it is an important part, a foundation of the u.s. economy. ethanol, i fought for ethanol since i was governor. it has lowered the price of fuel. it is created tens of thousands of jobs. i was in blair last week, a great example of bipartisan effort. there is a new dcompany with a hundred jobs. is is not a failure. this is not a threat to our economy. the interest of agriculture and the united states are completely in alignment. there's no need to choose. >> senator fischer? >> i grew up i
interesting things in this election is the growing gender gap. you are too young, but many in 1992 called it the year of the woman, because of the showdown between anita hill and at then- being-confirmed justice clarence thomas. where were the women's voices? you had that sense when georgetown student center fluk -- sandra fluke was called to testify on contraception and it was an all-metal panel. -- all-male panel. would you imagine that in the 21st century that contraception would be raised as a polarizing issue, huerta taken -- where todd akin is talking about legitimate rate. that has led to the fact that independent women are alienated by these extremists. we're not talking about abortion, which i think is a right and should be in this country. we're talking about women's health issues, calls to defund planned parenthood, to fight over contraception. these are linked to women's economic security. in that context, your question is right, that independent women influencing states have been pushed away. in virginia, a key swing state, president obama a week ago was leading by 19%. in oh
opportunities that my family had when we first came to nevada. this election is about the falling. people come over to me and say, i never missed a day of work. i never missed a mortgage payment. i lost my job. i lost my home. what will i do? the answer to that question is what this election will be about. who is going to fight for middle-income families? who will stick up for the people of the state of nevada? we need a champion tomake sure we concentrate on good paying jobs here in the state and we keep people in their homes and we protect older americans from ending their medicare. by turning it over to private insurance companies. veterans and make sure they get the benefits they deserve. my opponent is planning for the -- playing for the other side. he is taking care of the big guys. they do not need our help. wall street corporations, big oil companies, they are doing fine. the people in the state of nevada need a champion. at that time, my opponent was championing the wealthiest among us. i think the people in the stated that the state of nevada know just by listening to us and who is
the right to vote. >> whether you are marching for a cause or voting in the next election, make your voice heard. thank you for watching. >> hello, and good afternoon. thank you for coming to the industry summit. it is your participation your that makes this work so well. if you look at your program, you will see that our opening speaker is john newlin, president of the entertainment commission. i, however, and not john newlin. i have more hair than john newlin. but i am vice chair of the commission. permit compliance is up. the violence is down. a variety of entertainment is what makes our city great. we will touch on the upcoming party legislation -- party bus legislation and a safe place for our youth to go. after our panel discussion will have some regard groups so we can share ideas and brainstorm. we have a very luminary panel here. right now, i would like to introduce our cheap -- chief of police. [applause] >> good afternoon. i also am not john newlin, and i have less hair than him. [laughter] is a pleasure to be here for the second year. there are fewer people here. that might be
, different ways of power in cars. you heard that these are fully elected vehicles. the need to bring this into a holistic approach. what we have been doing under our solutions for the i brand, we have m brand, which is the most powerful actor in the alphabet. those products are well known. but the i brand is just coming. those vehicles are well into development now. the i 3 and i8 will be launched next year. they are carbon fiber and that will be made, not in this state, but just up the way in washington state. using fully environmentally sustainable energy. carbon fiber prevention will be shipped to our factories in europe or will be make carbon fiber cars. it is about 50% like you're than steel, 20% lighter than allen minium. you need the batteries ms. -- which makes the efficiency much more credible and also a strong business case. this part of the united states will play a strong part in the development of these vehicles. as well as we also started a venture firm. the venture fund operates out of new york. it started 15 months ago, we made our first investment in a company called
states court of appeals for the second circuit. interest include election law, administrative law, statutory interpretation, constitutional law and property and natural resources law. he is a resident of san francisco's mission district. we are honored to work chris almendorf. [ applause ] >> thank you very much and thank you to all of the candidates who are here today. we're very fortunate to be joined by six candidates and what i hope will soon be seven. all of the candidates have agreed to ask their supporters to be respectful of other candidates and the audience and to maintain quiet during the forum. i ask you to respect that commitment. every aspect of this forum will be equally fair to all participating candidates. as everyone here knows candidate debates are often limited to latitudinal appears and personal attack. our debate focuses on critical areas of policy disagreement among the leading candidates. so this end the league of women voters of san francisco and the san francisco public press working with researchers at uc davis, developed an issue position survey for the
is reorienting our economic polices away from the cronyism, the power elect elite and back to the small businesses. >> i was born and raised in the district. that is not why i think you should vote for me as your supervisor. my entire life was been committed to this district starting when i worked for the mayor where women were trained i know what good social services look like, but i understand that we can't exclude people because they are rich. we can't exclude people because they are middle-class at the expense of making sure we're taking care of one class of people. i worked really hard and there were a lot of people that helped me become the person who i am. sadly, my brother did not make it through. he is in jail now. my sister died from an overdose, and all of this to fight the good fight to make sure that access to opportunity doesn't stop with me. everybody on this panel, we have got some great people and they have made a lot of need to be taken into consideration. but i think that mine experience of not only being on the redevelopment agency commission and working on the fir
called for early elections in a bid to dissuade demonstrators from rallying. as many as 50 dozen people are expected to join the demonstration called for by the jordanian wing of the muslim brotherhood. turkey has authorized further military action against syria as a continue to fire artillery across the border for a second day thursday in retaliation for mortar blast that killed five turkish civilians. turkish police used teargas to disperse anti-war protesters to the turkish parliament while lawmakers overwhelmingly backed a measure allowing the military to conduct cross border actions. the turkish prime minister said the country was attempting to deter further violence. >> turkey wants peace in the region as well as safety. this is our sole concern. we do not want war and never would. the consequence of four in the region is obvious. the parliamentary authorization of foreign deployment of turkish troops is intended solely as a deterrent. as you are aware, one of the most important instruments to prevent clashes is deterrence. >> police in south africa have shot and killed another st
, fisherman's wharf, and part of the russian hill neighborhood. he was elected to the board in november of 2008 and has served as board president since january of 2009. we will get to know him and talk about the toughest issues facing them. thank you for joining us today. tell us about your background. >> my parents immigrated to the united states in the 1960's. i was the first kid born in the u.s. my parents sacrificed everything so that their kids could have the opportunities that they wanted when they came here. i grew up in the boston area and lived in different parts of boston. i went to catholic price school in dorchester, a section of boston. -- i went to catholic high school in dorchester, a section of boston. because of my parents, my brothers and i were all blessed to go to harvard university. that is where i went to school. it was intense. i stayed there for law school and have a master's in public policy from there. those are subjects i decided to study because i was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what
of high school. >> that is right. >> now you have two elections behind you, one as mayor as well. it's just amazing. you have another one -- how long are you mayor? >> four-year term. >> so you have three more years? >> yes, and then re-election. >> and you want to get some stuff done and some of that is around innovation. and you have called this the innovation capital of world. >> unabashedly. >> i have seen the banner at the airport. >> oh, gosh of course. >> tell me about your plans >> when i was inaugurated in january, i had gone through pretty intense re-election and talked to technology and business world and i had a mission, because out of that campaign and out of listening and be part of tech crunch and thank you for all being here. we have a great conference for the city. i announced a 17-point plan that included making sure that we stayed on top of being the innovation capital of the world. what does that mean? it means that we take advantage of the companies that are here, the technology companies that are here, to help us improve our city. to help us find
they are very out there when they are talking about something that is going to get them elected, but they don't want talk about themselves and their families and i felt as though he was kind of a different person and you can almost which many politicians, see the wheels turning. you could ask them a pretty simple question. it is not a trick question or a complicated question, but you see the wheels turning about how they will parse their answer. that is not only a lot different from what it was when i started decades ago, but it is also common to your point, has surprised me as well because the person that i heard about during the olympics was this guy that was this really nice, decent man. it seemed like they didn't want to share that until the convention. >> i was thinking as you were talking that a personal story about a politician i covered that surprised me, it was in 2001, mayor guiliani was divorcing his wife. he sent her a letter, telling her that she was fired as the first lady. i think this was after that. i got a tip about it, at an event for blumberg's that was running for mayor.
holding property and voting in elections. >> susan b. anthony dedicated her life to reform. >> suffrage in the middle of the 19th century accomplished one goal, it was diametrically opposed to this idea. >> many feared it would be corrupted by politics. >> women in the 19th century had to convince male voters that having the vote would not change anything. that woman would still be devoted to the home, the family, that they would remain pure and innocent, that having the vote would not corrupt them. >> support gradually grew in state and local campaigns. >> leaders like ellen clark sgt come repeatedly stopping these meetings -- , repeatedly stopping these meetings as a politically active figure. doing everything they could to ground the campaign in domesticity. >> despite their efforts, the link made it tough whenever voters were in the big city. a specialist in francisco. >> the problem with san francisco is that women's suffrage as an idea was associated. >> susan b. anthony joined the provision party. a deadly idea in san francisco. liquor was the foundation of the economy. and >> an
in modern history." the memo ends saying that the debuts will not decide the election. the first presidential debate will take place next wednesday in denver. you can watch it live on kron4's 24/7 bay area news channel on comcast channel 198 at 6:00 pm next week. >>> coming up, the director behind the anti-islam movie which fueled deadly protests is now behind bars. tomorrow marks the 20th year of critical mass. a tradition that has bikers taking over the streets of san francisco. >> later in this broadcast, the real referees return tonight in the nfl! oh, do we have maybe the catch of the year in baseball! giants and a's both working, heading toward the playoffs. what was grandma's cold remedy? hi, primo! asopao! right, asopao! there you go cuz, so you can sweat it out! oh, and music... ( all ) music? ... heals the soul. the power to share unites us. verizon brings your entire family the savings of the share everything plan. unlimited talk. unlimited text. and data you can share with up to 10 devices, all in one plan. get the 4glte droid razr by motorola for $99.99. verizon. tod
of you have ever wondered what an ls -- and elected officials sounds like with anesthesia and his mouth, i want to let you know that i got out of a dental chair 20 minutes ago after a few hours of dentists work. but i wanted to give a few remarks of how i think we are doing. i'm very much more are optimistic about how we're doing than four years ago. i read an article from the chronicle and it said that the candidates disagreed on everything, except for the need to crack down on entertainment violence. i did not propose anything for the first six months until there were half a dozen people affected. that was followed by a terrific shooting, which was then followed by an incident in union square. i want to take a moment and thank the san francisco police department for your input. if we pass legislation to require additional security requirements and plans. we pass legislation to give the entertainment commission more tools to shut down those handful of clubs that have often given a bad name to the rest of the industry. we passed legislation to pass for the first time a party registry. a
that if you could fight or die for the country or vote in an election, you should be able to go to a party. [applause] the folks that we were working with at the police department were hesitant about that. to address their concerns we agreed to very stringent beer gardens, which we did not feel like needed, but we did it in order to produce the event. later, we found out it would not be an 18 and older event. it essentially became a non- negotiable item. if we wanted them to sign off on the permit, with a bar, which was a major revenue stream, we had to be 21 and over. being a promoter and organizer with a long history of doing these events without problems, with a curved track record, that seemed like a perfect result. the police requirement at the event looked like two cops, with no problems with nothing to do, there were five officers at the event now, which we had to pay overtime fees for. trying to discuss this with the officers, public safety is brought up and it is very important to me and to us. i mentioned that i had another life as a part-time psychologist and a father, illustrat
issue in brazil, there are 2 million voters that can decide an election. it is very hard to make changes. >> it is time for school in this neighborhood. this is the second session of the day. brazil has done a good job getting more children into the education system that now there are not enough schools is like many, this one runs three ships. it is progress. a lot of the children come from families that hardly had any education. this boy says his mother only studied until fourth grade and he is not sure but maybe his father made it to fit. this girl is determined to go all the way through college and says studying is the path for the future. that ambition and gives her a challenge. her own training was minimal. she stepped into her first-class room with no practical experience and it was terrifying. with minimal resources, this school is trying hard but if it cannot provide the skilled work force to satisfy the demands of the economy, brazilian companies will look elsewhere for labor. >> it is a big, busy city. >> they will look for people like this person working as a head hunter. >> b
will face prison hugo chavez in elections one week from today. >>> protesters battled with riot police in spain saturday night. the austerity measures were imposed to help spain secure loans and reduce debt. unemployment in the nation is close to 25%. >>> today iraq, a series of bombings has left at least 16 people dead. thmajority of the blasts occurring in and around the city of baghdad. five explosions there and a car bombing at a check point that killed three iraqi police officers. >>> to syria now where rebel and government forces e fighting it out block by block. opposition liters say at least 21 people were killed across the nation in fighting yesterday. that's what it looked and sounded like on the streetses o aleppo. it's just one of the cultural and civilian landmarks being destroyed in civil war. i-tv's bill sealy has more. >> reporter: in one city this would be bad enough. in three, it's a disaster, but this is now the reality in the three main cities of syria. the ragings, troops fighting rebels for control of whole districts. aleppo is syria's biggest city and business ca
are like me, you did not come here to hear from elected officials. i look forward to hearing from the innovators. i wanted to join my colleagues in assuring all of you that we are looking forward to working with you to figure out how we create san francisco as the capital of innovation and the new economy. before i joined the board of supervisors, i started a web 1.0 company. what makes our city special is that everyone of you have ideas that will change our city and change the world. our mayor is responsible for managing the 50 plus executive- branch departments that will be interfacing with many of the policy areas you impact. scott and i and our colleagues are in charge of legislating and adapting to new technologies you have that are changing the way we all live. one thing we like to say at city hall is that as goes san francisco, often times so goes the rest of the country. as goes the rest of the country, so goes the world. i believe we're starting something special today that will do that for the entire planet. thank you for being here. i am looking forward to working with
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)